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Author Topic: increased risk of miscarriage with IBS sufferers ( albeit small)  (Read 8141 times)
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carrie
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« on: April 11, 2012, 09:57:15 AM »

I have signed up to IBS support site to try and get info on the FODMAP diet and came across this article which has only been posted it is from the Irish Times. I am aware there is a higher risk of miscarriage with M.E sufferers and as a lot of us have IBS  as a delight of our condition I am wondering if this is why there is an increase in the risk of miscarriage for us rather than just the general M.E itself. It is all very interesting. I would not say too worrying as the extra risk is still relatively small. But I feel It is good to know these things and am wondering if the IBS symptoms w ere well controlled with something like the FODMAP diet if the extra risk associated with M.E and miscarriage would be negated.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/health/2012/0410/1224314560778.html

Irritable bowel syndrome may increase risk of miscarriage


by MICHELLE McDONAGH

WOMEN WITH Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are more likely to suffer from miscarriages and ectopic pregnancies, according to new research by University College Cork (UCC) and the University of Manchester.

While the researchers are keen to reassure pregnant women with the common condition of IBS that their overall risk of miscarriage or ectopic pregnancy is still small, they say the study illustrates the importance of IBS and why it deserves serious research attention.

The findings, which were published in the international academic journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, were based on a large database of 100,000 women derived from general practices in the UK.

The study found that pregnant women with IBS were 7 per cent more likely to have a miscarriage than those unaffected, while there was a 1 per cent increase in ectopic pregnancy, a potentially life-threatening complication of early pregnancy.

Dr Louise Kenny of the Anu Research Centre at UCC said these findings also indicated the importance of prenatal care for women with IBS.

One in four pregnancies ends in miscarriage, and one in 100 pregnancies is ectopic. As the cause of many miscarriages and ectopic pregnancies is unknown, these findings are potentially important, according to Dr Kenny.

Prof Eamonn Quigley of the alimentary pharmabiotic centre at UCC pointed out that miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy were the only two complications of pregnancy where the outcomes were different in women with IBS, though the increased risk was very slight.

However, he said: “This research provides further evidence of the importance of IBS and is a new illustration of how IBS could cause problems outside of the gut. More research is needed to determine why IBS patients should have increased risks in pregnancy.”

IBS is one of the most common disorders of the gut, and sufferers typically complain of abdominal discomfort, bloating and difficulty with their bowels. The condition is most common among women in their late teens to early 40s, and little is known about what happens to IBS during pregnancy or how IBS affects the outcome of pregnancy.

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agapanthus
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2012, 10:47:54 AM »

That's interesting Carrie. I wonder if the reason is that 'they' don't know and don't give much heed to IBS, but that women who have IBS maybe have a higher risk of other conditions that are linked to it that are overlooked. The health service is set up to say that all that does not show up on their tests must be in the mind, but I believe there is a lot more to it than this.

For example I have had IBS for 40 yrs and I now have at least 2 autoimmune conditions (possibly 3 if you include ME/CFS), and had one autoimmune condition in my last pregnancy. I had threatened miscarriage with my first, and went into prem labour and he was smallish when finally born at 37 weeks. With my 2nd he was OK but 'small for dates'. With my 3rd I had this autoimmune condition triggered which means I produced low platelets in my blood. He was also on the small side. I didn't smoke and there was no other reason for me to give birth to small babies.

At the time I knew little about diet, and was eating a normal fairly healthy diet, but with probably lots of things like gluten that I would have been better to omit.
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carrie
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« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2012, 10:55:46 AM »

Yes, Aggie. I see your point, as you see from the brief voer view in the article it seems that they know little of why this happens and you may well be right that there are other problems going on as well. I hadn't thought of it like that.

If I remain on my morphine and get pregnant it is highly likely I will have a small baby I also smoke but this will hopefully be banned if I catch, i really will be giving it my best shot anyway. It is very interesting that you have th troubles you do and had 3 smaller babies. I really do feel there is so little research on links between conditions that it quite  scary. I know there is such a  vast array of health prooblems it would be difficult but MME is a perfect example of co-morbid conditions  affecting each other. The first I ahd ehard  was that there was an increased risk of miscarriage if you have M.E then I found this purely by accident and just wodnered if the two coincided but as you say it may well be there is more factors involved that lead to the above. Very interesting indeed.

I am looking into the FODMAP diet, do you know if it is recognised by NHS dieticians at all as my gastro said there is absolute nothing in the diet which affects IBS which I knew was a lot of rubbish. I was just wondering if the  FODMAP was a widely recognised management diet for IBS it sure has an awful lot of information and talk of it on this forum I came  across it also has a list of FODMAP dieticians around the world and there a re some in the UK albeit all down south and apparently Private.
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agapanthus
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« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2012, 11:08:04 AM »

Re FODMAP .... presumably you saw that I put a post on here following the item on it re the Food Programme last year? Did you see their item on it - might still be available on Ch 4 site actually?

 Have you seen the item on the net about the place that they went to which I think was this place......
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/medicine/research/divisions/dns/projects/fodmaps/index.aspx
If you look at the top line on this page it mentions Guys and St Thomas's publications with a link, and they are NHS hospitals in London.
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carrie
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2012, 11:19:31 AM »

Yes Aggie, it was your post which ahd got me thinking about the FODMAP diet but until now had forgotten to look into it more. I hadnt registered it was on the food hospital programme though, not sure what to make of that. I did not watch that series as I do not watch TV and was sceptical of a lot of the stuff I ahd been told they claimed about conditions.

i hadnt seen that  Aggie, thank you Yes I see what you mean so it at least being researched at NHS establishments. Very interesting read. Thank you
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