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neptuno
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« on: September 17, 2016, 04:18:22 PM »

Can anyone recommend a good Stone Age diet recipe book ?
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roger
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« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2016, 04:34:47 PM »

Hi nep,

I had four paleo cookbooks but gave them to a charity shop a few years ago & can't remember what any of them were called.  Personally, I didn't get on with the pure paleo approach, though I do eat lots of fat and not many - hardly any - carbs. I hope someone comes along with a good suggestion, but if not, if it was me, I'd enter 'paleo cookbooks' on Amazon, then read a lot of reviews! Of course the cheap way forward is eat what you're eating less grains and starches. Basically, that's paleo.

Good luck with the search.
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neptuno
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« Reply #2 on: September 20, 2016, 12:17:41 PM »

There's always a crap review for every good one !  I need to trawl the local charity shops   Wink
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roger
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« Reply #3 on: September 20, 2016, 12:44:42 PM »

Good luck with that, Nep - if you were near to Derby, I'd tell yo the charity shop I gave mine too. I suspect there's not much demand in Derby, so they've probably still got them  Smiley
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neptuno
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« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2016, 07:31:51 PM »

Has anyone tried to make DrMyhill's linseed loaf ?
Was it successful ?
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roger
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« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2016, 06:08:04 AM »

Yikes - why would anyone want to???  Smiley

When we give something like wheat up, there seems to be in ingrained need to replace it with something similar, which is why everyone goes for the gluten free junk food, which is as bad as wheat!

Going with organic salads, veg (not potatoes), fruit, healthy fats including grass fed butter and coconut oil, pastured eggs, nuts, seeds, sprouted seeds (very easy to do), smoothies and relatively small amounts of pastured meat worked wonders for me in all respects. It even made me better looking, and I was pretty good looking before I started so that was a hell of an achievement smile
« Last Edit: September 23, 2016, 06:20:00 AM by roger » Logged

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Anne56
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« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2016, 10:52:50 AM »

Lol Roger. I like your sense of humour.  Wink

I've looked at Dr Myhill's diet and I know that I couldn't keep to it. I eat lots of fruit and veg, chicken and fish. I also have nuts and seeds. I do have treats but limit myself. I am quite happy with my diet at the moment especially as my IBS has calmed down. (I have granola or muesli with prunes, oat bran, seeds and nuts with milk or yogurt for breakfast and it has really helped.)

Everyone is different but if you think it will work for you then go for it.

By the way my sleep has really improved since I followed Dr Myhill's advice re sleep. I take one Valerian and one melatonin tablet each night.  bedtime2

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agapanthus
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« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2016, 06:30:13 PM »

I found that I could not cope without any carbs long term, and so I now do have potato with my lunch and main meal, and I also eat some Pain des Fleurs which are very light crispbreads made with chestnut and rice flour with no other additions.

However I did eat a much more restricted diet for around 5 years, (more like Paleo or Stoneage) and so I think I have healed a lot of the gut issues that I had originally. I eat very low sugar (ideally should have none but I have one banana per day, and have developed a naughty liking for good quality ice cream but tend to put one spoonful into plain live yogurt). I also eat kefir which I make myself, made from almond/cashews. Also lots of nuts, seeds, and veg, and tend to have one meal a day with meat or fish. I don't do well with grains (other than rice) so don't have them.

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charmwah
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« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2017, 11:58:28 AM »

Hi all

My partner has just read Dr Myhills book and has decided to adopt the Stone Age diet as completely as possible. Can anybody share their experiences as to whether or not this in itself yielded significant results? Does it have to be applied wholesale, or is it the case that not everybody will have issues will all the foods listed and therefore some may be safely consumed without any adverse effects?
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roger
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« Reply #9 on: January 17, 2017, 12:20:24 PM »

Hi Dave,

Good on your partner - I'm very sure that, although the stone age diet isn't 'a cure' in itself, she'll benefit from it tremendously.

It's very easy to complicate this diet. In short, it's eating only real food (nothing in a packet or box, high in SATURATED fat (no it won't give you a heart attack), but nil trans/hydrogenated fat, moderate protein, loads of veg, reasonable amounts of fruit, and as close as you can get to nil carbs the better - ie bread, pasta, etc etc. Lots of purified water - urine should be a light straw colour. If all this can be done organically, so much the better.

Initially, it will seem weird, but I promise that within two to three weeks she'll start to feel the benefits.

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« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2017, 12:29:57 PM »

Thanks Roger.

I think she may struggle initially but if it makes a significant difference then Im sure she will keep it up. Im interested to find suitable substitutes for foods wed normally eat, some of which Ive found already for example coconut or buckwheat flour instead of wheat flour etc. substituting carbs in the form of potato / sweet potato is proving to be trickier.

Are there any recipes / cookbooks / websites that anybody can recommend to help?
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roger
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« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2017, 01:03:44 PM »

Hi Dave,

First, why look for potato substitutes? Just don't eat them - remember, the key to this approach is keeping carbs down to an absolute minimum.

You mentioned coconut, which reminds me, organic coconut oil (or grass fed butter or ghee) is the best choice for cooking. Extra virgin organic olive oil is okay for light cooking, like stir fry, but not for hot cooking.

For a long time now, I've treated food as fuel rather pleasure, so I just throw things together and eat them. So I don't have experience of cook books, but there are loads of them on Amazon. If nobody comes up with a recommendation here, maybe go to Amazon and look at the star ratings.

One final point - it's great that she's making a start, but she needs to consider the other aspects of the Sarah Myhill book too.
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« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2017, 01:24:15 PM »

Thanks Roger.

To make the transition easier from carbs to no carbs it makes sense to me to have an alternative or substitute. For example, instead of rice, cauliflower 'rice'. It's more a case of fooling yourself that you've had a complete meal than any dietary need...
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roger
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« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2017, 02:23:37 PM »

Yes, Dave, if it's for transition, that makes sense - it's better than going hardcore from day one then giving up  smile
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agapanthus
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« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2017, 03:37:07 PM »

If you are looking for cookbooks then you need to look under 'Paleo'. Actually Dr Myhill would say that her Stone Age isn't quite same, but it's a helpful guide.

I have never done total Stone Age (although I did come close at one point) and I feel that as I know I have a large gallstone, I would be cautious re the amount of fat I take in. I am not sure what her guidance on that is. Also if you do transition slowly and are looking for a good carb as a breakfast cereal, (and you do need some carbs), then I know a lot of people choose oats. I seem to recall that Dr M's guidance has changed over the years, and at one time she did keep oats in the diet.

However I did not get on with them, and I now have Teff seeds which I make into a porridge with water. It's worth researching them online, (you will need to buy them online maybe from Healthy Supplies), as they are very useful to eat as they are much higher in calcium than other seeds. I don't know how old your wife is, but I have discovered that I have osteoporosis so am keen to take in foods that are high in calcium.

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« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2017, 03:52:31 PM »

Thanks Agapanthus! (On a separate note, your name makes me smile; my grandad used to grow agapanthus in a large pot on his doorstep, brings back happy memories of my childhood!)

My partner is 35, but she does use a contraceptive injection whose side effects list osteoporosis for extended use, so I would be keen for her to keep as much calcium in her diet as possible. I know dark leafy greens are good for calcium. Ill see if we can find any teff seeds, but unlike me my partner has never been a big fan of muesli or porridge so I wont hold my breath. In fact, its only as a result of reading Dr Myhills book that she has finally started to regularly eat breakfast. Her not eating breakfast thus far was typically either due to nausea or lack of hunger rather than any deliberate avoidance.
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agapanthus
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« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2017, 04:06:56 PM »

Ah yes, I grow agapanthus also in a pot! I live in Cornwall now and it's a popular plant down here.

Yes, the calcium intake is tricky as the Stone Age diet doesn't have dairy, not that I believe that is the only place to find it. It's worth googling I think to see where else in the diet you can get it from. Shame about the porridge though as it's very comforting on a cold day and I am such a fan that I sometimes have it twice a day with a small snack in the afternoon. 

I also grow kale and have found a good way to eat that is to shred it finely and either steam it and eat it just like that, or I almost stir fry it quickly with a few other things added like courgettes and servie with an egg. I have that for lunch.
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roger
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« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2017, 04:08:14 PM »

Re calcium, I'd advise against supplementation, but if she ever takes that route, she MUST add vitamin K2 M7 to avoid artery buildup.

Aggie - the only carbs you NEED are those in fruit and veg. But I have to accept that very few people seem able to to avoid all the others (even me sometimes). It's the addictive sugar hit that you don't seem to get from plant carbs. sad
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« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2017, 07:49:08 PM »

Hi everyone. Roger - I was advised by my gp to take calcium as I have been through the menopause and I don't eat a lot of dairy. I take one every other day so its less than it says to take. How do I get the vitamin K2 M7. I've never heard of it. Can I get it in a multivitamin? Thanks.
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agapanthus
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« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2017, 10:30:37 PM »

I take Vit K2 Mk7 Anne. You can buy this over the internet, or maybe your local health shop might sell it.

If you buy from Bodykind and go via the banner at the bottom of the front page then the forum will gain a little from that sale. Bodykind are a very good firm to deal with - good value for money and free postage. They sell Vit K Mk7 as I buy mine from there. If you go into the Bodykind site, and then put K2 into the search bar several makes will come up.

Do you also take Vit D3 Anne? It's a good idea to take D3 and K2.
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roger
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« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2017, 06:36:36 AM »

Hi Anne,

Just to agree with Aggie's D3 suggestion - again from Bodykind. Doctor's Best is a good option - a year's supply of 5000ius for 13.95. The K2 I use is The Source Of Life make, which is very pure, organic food based. It's the first one to come up if you put K2 into Bodykind's search box.
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Anne56
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« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2017, 05:23:38 PM »

Thanks Roger. c017
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Anne56
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« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2017, 05:27:37 PM »

agapanthus - yes I take vitamin D and also calcium and magnesium together. I just wondered what the problem is with taking calcium tablets. I've decided to cut right down on my supplements due to the cost. i was thinking of taking a good multivitamin to cover any shortfall. I've never heard of vitamin K2. I will take a look at the Bodykind website though. Thanks. c017
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roger
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« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2017, 05:39:27 PM »

Hi Anne,

D3 increases absorption of calcium, so there's a danger that you can get a calcium buildup in your arteries - not inevitable, but possible. The right kind of K2 helps prevent that from happening.
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« Reply #24 on: January 30, 2017, 06:43:11 PM »

Thanks Roger.  Wink
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