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Author Topic: Vit D3  (Read 284 times)
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sleepy
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« on: December 06, 2016, 04:43:43 PM »

Hi all, advice welcomed...

I've been suffering with CFS for 14 months (diagnosed 6 months ago) and despite seeing my GP and a fatigue specialist, vitamin D levels weren't even mentioned. I decided to request a Vitamin D blood test myself and it turns out Im deficient. NHS levels are 50-70 if I remember correctly. My level was 37 and was advised that it wasn't especially low and that I just bought some over-the-counter tablets, with no advice given on how much to take. A bit of guesswork and googling led me to take a total of 75ug (3000iu) D3 tabs (plus 5ug in my multivit) and after 2 months my level has only risen to 41. I spend a fair mount of time outside, wearing shorts and short-sleeved tops all summer. From today I have decided to take a further 75ug in the evening but is there a better form of D3 I should be taking, and does it really make much difference once the desired D levels are reached?

Thanks, Mark
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roger
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« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2016, 05:45:01 PM »

Hi Mark,

First, 50 to 70, is LOW based on latest research and you should be aiming for at least 125. To achieve that, I'd suggest 5000iu a day - this is a good source for a 12 month supply http://www.bodykind.com/productsearch/go?view=list&w=vit+d3 . Wherever you get it from, it MUST be D3 and not D2. There is some, not much, concern that taking too much D3 can increase calcium absorption, which isn't a brilliant idea. To cover that small risk, vitamin K2 is a good idea - it doesn't slow absorption, but it sends the calcium to the Right place (the bones) and prevents it from settling in the wrong place (the arteries). This is a good one - http://www.bodykind.com/product/5980-source-of-life-garden-vitamin-k2-60-vegicaps.aspx

There's a good thread on the subject here - http://forum.chronicfatiguesyndrome.me.uk/index.php/topic,5894.0.html
« Last Edit: December 06, 2016, 05:46:51 PM by roger » Logged

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roger
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2017, 02:57:12 PM »

A bit more info from the highly rated Dr Mark Stengler -

STOP damage in your DNA and SLOW aging!

It's an old cliché, but there's a certain truth to it: Spring really is a time of youth and renewal.

And fortunately, you don't have to be young to celebrate this youthful new season.

Even if you've seen a few more springs than you care to admit, you have the golden opportunity right now to turn back the clock and SLOW aging.

Yes, friend, the sun not only helps reawaken the flowers and grass as the days grow longer...

It can make you YOUNGER!

I'm not just talking about that "youthful glow" you get from a little sunlight. New research reveals how the nutrient your body makes from sun exposure can recharge your DNA.

Deep down in your cells, on the very ends of your DNA, sit little caps called telomeres. Like the caps on a shoelace, they keep the whole strand from coming apart.

As your cells replicate -- and as you get older -- the telomeres shrink. When they get too short, the cells start to die off, and your risk of heart disease, cancer, dementia, and even death all jump.

But the new study finds that simply boosting your levels of the sunshine vitamin can slow the shrink of those telomeres.

Folks with blood levels of D over 50 nmol/L had the longest telomeres -- a.k.a. the YOUNGEST -- of everyone in the study.

That's certainly an achievable number. If anything, that's at the low end of what you want for maximum benefits.

But most Americans don't come close, with 80 percent of U.S. adults at 30 ng/mL or less.

If you're not making an effort to boost your own D levels, you're probably among them... and that means if you want the age-fighting benefits of vitamin D, you're going to have to take action.

The cheapest way, of course, is to make sure you get a little sunlight every day. But it's also important to practice sun safety, so limit your sunscreen-free time outside and cover up or head indoors before you burn.

Since it's hard to tell how much D your body is generating -- and it changes throughout the year -- consider a D supplement.

Most folks need between 2,000 and 5,000 IU per day.

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