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Author Topic: Doctor knows best - Sometimes part 2  (Read 1396 times)
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roger
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« on: August 18, 2017, 07:43:55 AM »

Continues from ‘Doctor knows best – sometimes’ part 1

Also, throughout allopathic medicine’s history, there have been numerous cases of accepted wisdom later proven to be wrong, and in some cases, dangerous – thalidomide springs immediately to mind. Many, many drugs have been given the all clear by the authorities only to be withdrawn months or a few years later because of the damage, including fatalities, done to patients. Your doctor will happily prescribe new drugs based on the glowing reference given by a medical rep, whose only objective is to sell product, but who knows how many of these new drugs will be found dangerous at some future date?

In terms of general advice, we’re told we must get our cholesterol and blood pressure levels down to unnecessarily low levels via drugs that are known to be harmful. And low fat dietary advice to avoid heart disease is still widely believed. But up until the late 1950s fat was eaten with gusto, and this fat was saturated animal fat. Since the main population switched to plastic artificial hydrogenated and Trans fat spreads, heart disease has escalated at an alarming rate. Still, at least they finally got the advice on sugar right, which is what many other researchers have been saying for decades.

A question, and I’ve wracked my brain on this – do you know of ANYONE with a chronic illness who has been CURED by their doctor or a specialist referred to by their doctor? If so, please tell me because I don’t. And by ‘cured’ I mean back to their old self with no reliance on medications.

I really do have a lot of sympathy for the good, well-meaning GPs who might hear from a patient that they have recovered via some or other alternative modality. The GP might research this modality and discover that it has validity. But he can’t use it because he’s tied to rules devised largely by ‘the machine’. This must be incredibly frustrating!

So, in a few areas, trauma related for example, the ‘medical machine’ can be justifiably applauded, but when it comes to chronic illness, I feel it to be incredibly lacking to say the very least.

One final point that you may not be aware of – according to US research, treatment by the allopathic medical system is estimated to be the third cause of premature death, third only to heart disease and cancer. Worldwide, pharmaceutical companies are fined billions of dollars a year for various misdemeanours. They pay these fines willingly because they represent a tiny percentage of their profits, and the payment keeps their executives out of jail.

Something else that you might not be aware of is that in the US and the UK, Pharma is given immunity from prosecution for vaccine damage. Instead, the tax payer pays compensation to vaccine damaged people and this amounts to millions a year. We’re told vaccines are totally safe, so why are all these compensation payments necessary?

What I’ve been trying to get over here is that although a lot of good has come from medical science, so has a lot of bad. Not everything your doctor tells you is right because not all of what those who educate and support him is right. By all means show your doctor respect, and listen to what he has to say, but he’s not God and I don’t believe that all his advice should be automatically accepted as Gospel.

Please feel free to respond to this thread for discussion and argument or with any questions.


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Anne56
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« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2017, 01:21:25 PM »

 clap clap clap clap clap

Well said Roger. When I was growing up doctors were treated like gods and we all trusted everything they said. Now I do my own research and decide for myself. I show them respect but they are not perfect. Many of us on here are more knowledgeable about ME/CFS than the doctors.  c017
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roger
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« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2017, 01:42:55 PM »

 c017 again, Anne!
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roger
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« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2018, 03:24:56 PM »

“It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor of the New England Journal of Medicine.” – Dr. Marcia Angell, a physician and longtime editor-in-chief of the New England Medical Journal (NEMJ) (source)

“The case against science is straightforward: much of the scientific literature, perhaps half, may simply be untrue. Afflicted by studies with small sample sizes, tiny effects, invalid exploratory analyses, and flagrant conflicts of interest, together with an obsession for pursuing fashionable trends of dubious importance, science has taken a turn towards darkness.” – Dr. Richard Horton, the current editor-in-chief of the Lancet – considered to be one of the most well respected peer-reviewed medical journals in the world. (source)
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agapanthus
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« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2018, 10:12:05 AM »

The Lancet was only too happy to publish the PACE trial which looked at GET and CBT as effective treatments for CFS presumably because it did not have small sample sizes and was conducted by well-respected psychiatrists (ahem). Unfortunately it also was very dubious in other respects and other well-respected scientists (as well as patient groups) have criticised it and asked Richard Horton for an independent review to no avail.
http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2016/02/clamour-grows-for-independent-inquiry-into-the-pace-trial-open-letter-to-the-lancet-republished-11-february-2016/

The damage done to patients over the world especially in terms of a validation of GET as suitable treatment, (which has rendered some of them physically incapable forever as a result), and indirectly for years lack of biomedical research, caused by this trial has been enormous. Yes, certainly 'science has taken a turn towards darkness' Mr Horton.
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carrie
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2018, 11:59:08 PM »

Hi Roger, forgive my very late response, but to back up the fact you said they allopathic medicine has its benefits and pitfallls, within a nine month period ( when I was pregnant,) they managed to nearly kill me and my daughter three or four time, but then saved my arm and my life when I had the embolism and DVTs, but then kicked me to the kerb again after patching me up. Without them I’d be screwed but it’s coming to light more and more the harm they have done to me and my body over the last 22 years. We have to follow some of the things they say due to finances and need etc, but I sure as heck won’t trust a word they say until I have researched everything myself. I am currently battling them to,prove what I have been saying now for the better part of twenty years and getting little headway!
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roger
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« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2018, 06:22:17 AM »

Thanks for posting on this thread, Carrie. I should stress/reiterate that in an emergency situation the 'medical machine' would be my first choice. And in many cases, where worthwhile tests are available, it's pretty good at diagnosis. But in my experience, where symptoms are complex and for chronic illness already diagnosed, it's all about symptom suppression and the curable is never cured.
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2018, 06:10:18 PM »

I have rarely found a medicine that doesn't break something else while 'fixing' the original problem. Sometimes they can be helpful for short term acute situations until a more permanent solution is found.

For example, I had read about salt pipes in a few places, including here. After seeing how much my breathing improved when I spent a bit of time near the sea last year I decided to get one to try and replicate the sea-air effect.

I discovered that not only did it help with my breathing - my peak flow is now better without my inhaler than it used to be with it - but several other problems that I didn't realise were inhaler side-effects have now greatly diminished.

- My insomnia now only usually keeps me awake till 2am or 3am instead of the previous regular anytime between 4am and 7.30am. So I now longer need to take the occasional sleeping pill. (which I never liked taking, and avoided making a habit of it, but one has to sleep sometime.)

- I used to have incredibly sore jaw pains, and tried night guards against clenching, pain killers, Bowen therapy (which helped for a few months but then it came back.) My face and throat also regularly got swollen, and it looked and felt like I had mumps, or was stuffed with cotton balls. The GP hadn't a clue what to with it, and suggested they could prescribe Duloxetine if it didn't go away. That has also rescinded to almost nothing since giving up the inhaler. So a big, no thanks, to the Duloxetine.

- I am therefore able to drastically cut down my painkillers, which again I restricted as much as possible, but there's only so much I can take pain wise!

- and because I no longer take painkillers I've cut down the irritation to my dodgy stomach. (They wanted to give me Omeprazole so that I could take extra painkillers! I'd already been through that particular hell, and the hassle of giving it up, so I gracefully declined.)

All because I replaced my inhaler with a salt pipe.  Undecided

(I still carry the inhaler everywhere just in case, I would obviously use it in an acute situation or emergency).
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roger
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« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2018, 06:35:58 PM »

Hi CeeDee,

Salt Pipes really are good for asthma, allergies and even COPD. I’ve recommended them to lots of folk and they’ve all benefited. In fact, they are recognised as a medical device and can be prescribed, but I’ve yet to hear of a doctor prescribing them.

If your pipe is the type with a plugged hole in the bottom for changing the salt, you could try adding a few drops of GOOD QUALITY eucalyptus essential oil through the hole for even greater benefits.

In my experience most ‘ailments’ can be relieved naturally without the inevitable pharmaceutical side effects. Why? Because pharmaceuticals are created from man made chemicals and natural options aren’t.

To be fair, there are occasions where pharmaceuticals are the right approach, but not that many.
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