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Author Topic: Toxicity  (Read 1228 times)
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roger
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After 12 years of trying, I'm now A OK


« on: August 27, 2017, 04:15:34 PM »

Please note - before reading this thread and any that might follow, it's important to read the introduction thread because this will give you an indication as to whether or not this board might be of value to you.

We live in a toxic world, and many of the toxins are unavoidable. We shouldn’t worry about those because as we can’t do anything about them, the worrying will create stress, and stress is yet another toxin adding to the load. However, there are toxins that we CAN do something about if we’re mindful to do so, and reducing or even eliminating these takes a big load off our digestion, our liver, our kidneys and our lymph system, freeing up energy that can be used by our immune system and our healing mechanisms, making it easier to get well. That’s got to be worthwhile, hasn’t it?

In the previous diet and water threads, I talked about reducing the toxins we put IN our bodies. Here, I’d like to talk about some of the toxins in our homes, along with those we put ON our bodies, because these are the toxins that we can do something about -

In our homes

Air fresheners, whether sprays, freestanding or plug-ins are all highly toxic. What’s the alternative? An easy one is essential oils used in a diffuser. There are plenty of reasonably priced diffusers on Amazon, and you can use any essential oil of your choice – geranium is quite nice. When buying essential oils though, check the label and buy only those that have no other ingredients. Another option is to regularly brew coffee or bake bread – great smells!

Household cleaning products – most of the mainstream products are toxic, though the ecover range and a few others are okay to use. Alternatively, consider using things like steam cleaners, white vinegar, baking soda and food grade hydrogen peroxide. There is plenty of info on the internet regarding how to use these.

What you put on your body

If you lie in the bath for half an hour, the water in the bath will have reduced by more than a pint, and I’m not including the water still on you when you get out of the bath. Where did it go? You sucked it in via your skin. I mention this to illustrate that some of everything you put on your skin is absorbed, eventually getting into your blood stream, and much of what you put on your skin is toxic. The following is about some of them -

Hair spray – try spraying this on your hand then feel it. It’s sticky goo, and every time you spray your hair, some of that ‘sticky goo’ ends up in your lungs, and I’d put that ‘sticky goo’ up there with smoking in terms of toxicity. I’m afraid I don’t know of a viable alternative, so if you really must use hair spray, I’d suggest doing so in an open space, holding your breath, pinching your nose and closing your eyes, which are super toxin absorbers.

Talcum powder – this contains carcinogens, and as you use it, you breathe it in. Don’t use it!

Hand, face and body creams – in general these are toxic, and the more expensive they are, the more toxic they tend to be - even baby lotions contain a worrying array of chemicals. Alternatives – organic coconut oil, either the normal type or the liquid type. Both of these are greasy, and if you use too much you won’t like it, so don’t use too much! With the liquid variety, just a few drops is all you need. Organic aloe vera gels and butters are good, too. If you have skin issues, try this it’s really good and it’s nontoxic.

Perfumes – these are super toxins. Alternative – try experimenting with good quality essential oils.

Cosmetics – very toxic, and I’m afraid that includes the current trend for fancy nail colouring. Alternatives – I’d say ‘grow old naturally’, but knowing a few ladies, I suspect that if I was a lady I’d tell me to ‘sod off’, too, so I won’t say it. But there are a few organic, chemical free cosmetic companies these days, so maybe consult with Mr Google?

Hair dye – major brands are one of the most toxic things you can put on your body. But again there are ‘clean’ ones around, so while you’re consulting Mr Google about cosmetics, why not ask him about clean hair dyes, too?

Antiperspirants and deodorant – both are toxic and you’re putting them right where some major lymph nodes are – yikes! Unless you have some sort of over-sweating issues, I’d avoid antiperspirants completely – sweating is detoxifying and that’s good. And please don’t be fooled by the ‘stone’ type deodorants. Most of them contain aluminium, which is a highly toxic metal – they usually disguise this fact by putting ‘alum’ on the ingredient label in tiny print. I make my own deodorant with a base of liquid coconut oil and aluminium free baking soda plus a few antibacterial additions – it’s the bacteria that makes you stink.

Toothpaste – full of nasty chemicals. There are some fairly ‘clean’ ones out there, but they tend to be very expensive. Alternatives – simple aluminium free baking soda works very well, but it’s not difficult to be creative. I make my own recipe in batches. It takes about ten minutes to make enough for a month. There are also lots of good recipes on the internet.

Mouthwash – again, full of chemicals that the body hates, and swishing in the mouth results in almost instant absorption into the bloodstream. Alternatives – I use a 50/50 mix of 3% food grade hydrogen peroxide and water. It doesn’t taste brilliant, and it tends to froth in the mouth if you swish for a minute or so – in fact, the more your mouth needs cleaning, the more it froths. It’s very effective though and dirt cheap.

Showers and baths – First, your body is heavily populated by beneficial bacteria, and every time you wash your skin, a few of them go to bacteria heaven. I’m not suggesting that you should get smelly, but it is possible to be over-clean. Right, to business – unless you have a whole house water filter, part of what you’re absorbing into your body is toxicity from the water. There’s little you can do about many of the toxins involved, but there is one that you can neutralise, and it’s a biggie – chlorine. I shower, and I use one of these, though mine’s an older model. It neutralisers almost all of the chlorine via a vitamin C filter. Filters last me three months and are cheap and easy to replace. If you prefer a bath, adding a desert spoon of cheap ascorbic acid will do what my shower head does. I’ve heard that Borax added to bath water can neutralise fluoride, but I’ve never been able to verify that.

Also, consider your soap, shower gel and shampoo – most are toxic. I use this for all body and hair cleaning. There are several options, including pure Castile, so you don’t have to use the tea tree.

I’m running out of space so I’ll end my list, but if there’s anything you’re using that isn’t mentioned above, check the ingredients and research them – chances are, you won’t like what your research reveals.

Finally, it’s easy to think that you’ve been putting what I’ve described as toxins on your body and in your mouth for years and they haven’t damaged you. As far as I know, there’s nothing in the medical literature called ‘toxin disease’, but I’m quite sure that many of the ‘diseases’ of aging like heart disease, cancer, diabetes and arthritis etc, are caused by toxins, at least partly though often totally. But if you finish up with such a disease, you won’t relate it to the toxic substances you’ve been using because, as I said, you’ve been using them for years. The body’s detox systems – liver, kidneys, colon, skin, lymph system – are pretty good at what they do, eliminating toxins on a daily basis, but over time, possibly decades, they get overwhelmed, and when that happens your body starts to deteriorate. Then one day, all hell breaks loose – perhaps because you dyed your hair, or did whatever, for forty years.

As mentioned earlier, there’s no point in worrying about the toxins you can do nothing about, but I do think it’s worth seriously considering eliminating some of those that you can.

Please feel free to post and ask questions, offer arguments or generally discuss.  
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 04:17:44 PM by roger » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2018, 03:26:24 PM »

In case you doubt the dangers, these two links are worth reading -

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/consumer-alert-air-fresheners

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/cleaning-products-damaging-smoking-20-cigarettes-day
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2018, 09:49:28 AM »

Some more info -

From “lemon fresh” to “crisp pine,” the fragrances of cleaning products can really make your home smell spick-and-span. But have you ever considered that all those lovely scents could be laden with toxins?

You see, in most conventional cleaning products, fragrances don’t come from a squeeze of actual lemon or a drop of real pine oil.

That’s right, they come from chemicals and those chemicals contain hazardous sunstances, without a doubt.

For example, we’ve known for decades that two common (and practically unpronounceable) fragrance chemicals – phthalates and perchloroethylene – could cause cancer, but companies continue to regularly use them in cleaning products without putting them on ingredient labels.

Fortunately, in countries like the UK and the European Union labelling laws are much stricter than in the US. However, that doesn't mean that unscrupulous companies don't find ways around these laws.

The good news is that as consumers are getting more and more aware of the ingredients and chemicals inside the products they buy, laws are changing to protect consumers. In the US, lawmakers recently passed the Cleaning Product Right to Know Act. Starting in 2020, manufacturers of cleaning solutions and air fresheners (another common source of toxic fragrances) will have to disclose harmful fragrance chemicals used in their products.

This means that you’ll be able to see which products contain dangerous chemicals by visiting the companies’ websites, before you purchase the product from a supermarket shelf. Since online disclosures won’t be required for another two years, it gives manufacturers ample time to reformulate their products. And if they’re smart, they’ll remove toxic fragrances from the mix before you have a chance to spot them and run the other way.

Here's for hoping that the same laws will apply to imported goods and that those goods will be heavily scrutinised before they are allowed to cross borders... Hopefully, this new movement to toxin-free living will have a ripple effect all over the world. Goodness knows, now is the time to clean our air and start protecting our health and our planet.

In the meantime, choosing “fragrance-free” products is a step in the right direction – but that doesn’t mean they’re free of other toxins like “quats,” which can up your risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Even supposedly “green” cleansers can contain harmful toxins, so read all ingredient labels carefully.

A sure bet for avoiding toxins altogether is to clean things the “old-fashioned” way: with time-tested germ-busters like baking soda, vinegar, and plain old soap and hot water.
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« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2018, 05:36:25 PM »

And more info - https://draxe.com/home-cleaning-products/?rs_oid_rd=446066717817365&utm_campaign=20180318_newsletter_curated_week12_sns&utm_medium=email&utm_source=smart+blast
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Kaikagaga
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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2018, 05:06:26 AM »

This topic is most useful.
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roger
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2018, 05:28:08 AM »

Hi Kaikagaga, and welcome to the forum.

I'm glad you found the topic useful.
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« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2018, 12:31:54 PM »

I’ve been doing more research on this subject recently. Here’s my new motto – ‘if you wouldn’t eat it, don’t put it on your skin’.

Why? Processed and sprayed foods (and tap water) are full of toxins, but at least your body gets a chance to neutralise or remove them via the digestive system, the liver, the colon and the kidneys – these things WON’T get rid of all the crap, but they will get rid of some of it. But the toxins you put on your skin get straight into your bloodstream avoiding all but one of the protective systems. And even that one – the liver – can’t get to work until the toxins have been all round your body.
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« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2018, 07:37:04 AM »

Talcum powder - https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/12/business/johnson-johnson-talcum-powder.html
« Last Edit: July 16, 2018, 07:41:53 AM by roger » Logged

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