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Author Topic: Finding a baseline for cognitive symptoms  (Read 220 times)
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CAR
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« on: October 17, 2017, 11:30:54 AM »

Apologies if this has topic has already come up...

I am attempting to find a baseline so I can start pacing. I understand it's the period of time when one feels okay doing nothing, which makes sense for physical fatigue; however, I often find that a short walk actually helps my cognitive symptoms ("blows away the cobwebs" as it were),whereas resting in a chair makes it worse.  I was wondering if anyone has similar issues or could give any advice as to how to determine a baseline?  It's not quite as linear as, say, do an activity for five minutes then increase, as the activity in itself may actually ameliorate my cognitive symptoms (headache, enclosed vision etc).

I hope that makes sense!
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roger
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2017, 11:49:59 AM »

Hi CAR,

Do you feel okay following the short walk, or do you get symptoms, either immediately or during the following couple of days? If the former, fine - keep doing it. But if the latter I'm afraid I'd advise against. 
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CAR
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2017, 04:06:47 PM »

Hi Roger,

I have to say on the walk I often feel better - less visually enclosed, and more upbeat (from the release of endorphins??). I don't suffer any real  physical symptoms after, nor the following days (quite unusual I guess) . Plus I try not to walk to my limit; I could do more. However, yes, immediately after (and perhaps on and off for the rest of the day) my mental symptoms could be worse. Perhaps I should reduce the length of walk even more, despite the good feeling it brings at the time.
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roger
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2017, 04:36:04 PM »

Well I do think you have to experiment to find the right level, Carr, but it has to be expected that sometimes the experiment will bring the wrong result and you'll pay the price. But if I'm understanding correctly, you can handle the walk with no adverse consequences and that helps you cognitively. On that basis I'd go with the 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it' rule, but maybe increasing your walk in VERY SMALL increments over time.

Good luck!
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CAR
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2017, 06:41:32 PM »

That makes sense what you say. Many thanks Roger. Yes that's right - I'm fine physically and usually feel better actually doing it. I think because I don't suffer physically from it I tend to push too much and perhaps should gauge how I feel cognitively/"mentally"  afterwards, then increase slowly over time if I can. But, as you say, it's a bit experimental as some days are inevitable better than others.
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roger
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2017, 05:29:40 AM »

Yes, CAR, some days are inevitably better than others. Listen to your intuition and you should be okay  smile
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